Planet Ark News

Eggs-ellent Easter Eco-Tips

Date: 19-Mar-14
Author: Jess McCallum

What choices are you making for an eco-friendly Easter? © Jess McCallum

What choices are you making for an eco-friendly Easter?

Australians rank among the largest consumers of Easter eggs in the world, eating an average of 20 eggs each per Easter season! With the Easter period almost upon us, here's three simple ways to celebrate in eco-friendly style (and there's plenty of chocolate involved!).

Sweet Tooth

One of the best and easiest actions you can take is to buy Fairtrade chocolate. Purchasing Fairtrade helps improve the living standards of cocoa farmers living in the developing world and fosters a better future for their families and communities. The Fairtrade website allows you to search for stockists with Fairtrade chocolate in your local area (among many other items like sugar, tea and coffee).

Buying palm-oil free treats is important, as the industry is linked to major issues such as deforestation, habitat degradation, climate change, animal cruelty and indigenous rights abuses in the countries where it is produced, particularly south-east Asia. Palm oil can be disguised as other ingredients so if you are unsure, contact the manufacturer.

Special Species

If you prefer your chocolate is a cute furry shape rather than an egg we'd encourage you to give the Easter Bunny a miss and go for an Easter Bilby! As well a enjoying the chocolate you'll get the warm inner glow of knowing that you're helping one of Australia's cutest little native animals.

Look for a little bilby in your supermarket or lolly shop or check out the Pink Lady or Haigh's varieties. If you aren't into the sweet treat, you could make a donation to the Save The Bilby Fund or Rabbit Free Australia. They're doing great work to protect this precious Aussie Easter icon.

Shiny Wrappers

Although there's a myriad of colours and sizes, there's only one way to dispose of Easter egg foil wrappers - and that's to recycle them! Collect your foil wrappers and bunch them into a ball. They're too small and light to recycle on their own, but in a big ball, you can recycle them in your kerbside bin. Get your friends and family on board and see who can make the biggest foil feature!

If you've got some great tips for an egg-stra eco Easter, email us at social@planetark.org and we'll share our favourites on our social media channels!

  • Recycling Week
  • Business Recycling
  • recycling Near You
  • Make It Wood
  • Tree Day
  • Cartridges for Planet Ark